Album Review – Krisiun / Forged In Fury (2015)

These Brazilian veterans show us once again how good old school Death Metal sounds better when forged in sheer fury.

Rating5

Krisiun_Forged In FurySince the year of 1990, Brazil has become a synonym for fast, brutal and technical Death Metal due to the volcanic music engendered by Death Metal brothers Krisiun. And although there has been significant and obvious changes in their music from their 1995 debut album Black Force Domain to their brand new release entitled Forged In Fury, especially their move from that nonstop demonic carnage highly influenced by Black Metal from their early days to today’s melodic and metallic groove, they keep kicking ass and crushing our bones no matter what.

The professionalism and complexity of the artwork, designed by renowned American artist Joe Petagno, already gives the listener a good taste of what Forged In Fury is about: straightforward and deeply infuriated Death Metal. It might not be their best album to date (it doesn’t get close to that), with a couple of songs sounding like filler just to add extra time to the album, but it’s still a solid Krisiun release that will cause some serious damage to the spinal cord of fans of extreme music and admirers of the work of this talented Brazilian power trio.

Ready, set, go! Brothers Kolesne warm up the listener for a minute before the massacre starts in Scars of the Hatred, with drummer Max Kolesne being so precise and fast it’s hard to believe he’s only human. In addition, this song perfectly represents the evolution in their musicality, with the addition of lots of groove but always keeping their viciousness burning. And Max keeps sounding like a machine gun on drums in Ways of Barbarism, a brutish tune that makes it impossible not to slam into the pit. Their technique is impressive, with Alex Camargo and Moyses Kolesne giving a lesson in Death Metal with their powerful bass lines and guitar riffs and solos, respectively. Strident bass and riffs kick off the fuckin’ excellent Death Metal attack Dogma of Submission, where Alex sounds truly barbaric with his growls and Max continues his path of destruction with his unique fury and skills. If you love violence in music, this track is tailored for you.

KrisiunStrength Forged in Fury is very rhythmic and aggressive, offering everything modern Death Metal is comprised of, including sick guitar solos, harsh lyrics and a hellish atmosphere. It feels like a “special package” with three awesome songs in one thanks to the amazing job done by all band members. On the other hand, Soulless Impaler is way below the other songs in the album. The music itself never really takes off, as if something keeps holding it down, becoming quite disappointing after a while. Fortunately, in Burning of the Heretic it looks like the three brothers are mad at something or someone based on the level of devastation presented. I loved its riffs and how the vocals match flawlessly with all instruments, and what to say about the demented guitar solos delivered after four minutes?

If you want to do some sick headbanging, take a listen at The Isolated Truth to have your neck broken by its intensity. This is a good example of how they can sound clean and vicious at the same time, one of the main characteristics that took them to stardom. And like a squad marching to war, Krisiun deliver another Death Metal feast in Oracle of the Ungod, with highlights to the great work done by Moyses on the guitar, enhancing the song’s melody and flow, not to mention the metallic bass lines by Alex puncturing our ears. Following that sonic havoc, the groovy and progressive Timeless Starvation showcases the outstanding production of the album, with Alex mercilessly growling the story told in the song amidst a precise and intricate musicality. This great tune should sound amazing live, with highlights to its superb ending thanks to the flawless guitar lines by Moyses. I’m not sure what the short acoustic track Milonga de la Muerte is doing in the album, but it ends up being an interesting outro for its regular version. And if you grab a special version of it, you’ll be delighted with more of Krisiun’s unique destruction in Earth’s Cremation and with their brilliant tribute to Black Sabbath with their dark version for the classic Electric Funeral.

To sum up, as previously mentioned, Forged In Fury might not be masterpiece nor be among Krisiun’s best albums, but it’s still above average and a decent addition to the band’s belligerent discography. If you’re a longtime fan of the band and has been having fun witnessing their development through the years, you’ll have a good time listening to Forged In Fury. And if you’re new to Krisiun, go check out how Death Metal sounds a lot better when it’s forged in sheer fury.

Best moments of the album: Ways of Barbarism, Dogma of Submission and Electric Funeral.

Worst moments of the album: Soulless Impaler and The Isolated Truth.

Released in 2015 Century Media

Track listing
1. Scars of the Hatred 5:42
2. Ways of Barbarism 6:32
3. Dogma of Submission 4:55
4. Strength Forged in Fury 6:07
5. Soulless Impaler 6:11
6. Burning of the Heretic 6:21
7. The Isolated Truth 4:09
8. Oracle of the Ungod 4:43
9. Timeless Starvation 5:56
10. Milonga de la Muerte 0:53

Special Edition bonus tracks
11.Earth’s Cremation 3:49
12.Electric Funeral (Black Sabbath cover) 4:40

Band members
Alex Camargo – bass, vocals
Moyses Kolesne – guitar
Max Kolesne – drums