Album Review – Thrashfire / Into the Armageddon (2019)

It’s time for total annihilation blasted by three metallers from “the land of four seasons” who are ready to thrash until their very last breath.

It’s not everyday that we’re able to face a band hailing from Turkey, but whenever that happens, and we have some good examples here on The Headbanging Moose with Inhuman Depravity, Diabolizer, Grotesque Ceremonium, Axxen Conners, Sülfür Ensemble and Engulfed, the music is always vibrant, fun and, above all, heavy-as-hell. That can also be said about an unrelenting Ankara-based trio that goes by the name of Thrashfire, unleashing upon humanity pure Speed and Thrash Metal since their inception back in 2006. After the release of their debut self-titled demo in 2007, followed by a promo EP titled World Domination in 2010, their first full-length album Thrash Burned The Hell in 2011 and the EP Vengeance Of Fire in 2015, it’s time for Thrashfire to violently thrash us all with their sophomore opus Into the Armageddon, undoubtedly their best work to date.

Comprised of vocalist and guitarist Burak Tavus, bassist Okan Özden and drummer Gürkan Güvendik, the band has been on an incendiary roll since day one, having already shared the stage with renowned acts like Destruction, Artillery, Rumble Militia and Venom Inc., as well as numerous shows within Turkey and a mini-tour in Germany in 2017, where they will return in November 2019 to play at the infamous True Thrash Fest Hamburg. Featuring a classic, gruesome and absolutely awesome artwork by Ozan Yildirim (Deadhouse Studio), Into the Armageddon is an intense and infernal thrashing extravaganza that will surely be the delight of lovers of bands like Kreator, Dark Angel, Slayer and Sodom, proving why Thrashfire are one of the biggest names in Turkish Thrash Metal, if not the biggest one of all.

The opening tune Pure Devastating Necromancy begins in full force with Burak screaming like a demented beast from the very first second, offering us all pulverizing, high-octane Thrash Metal where Gürkan sounds absolutely brutal on drums, generating a thunderous ambience together with Okan’s vile bass lines. In Katacomb (The Kingdom of Ressurrection), a quick and somber intro morphs into a frantic circle pit-catalyst led by Burak’s classic thrashing riffs and raspy vocals, feeling like a hybrid between old school Slayer with Death Angel and Exodus (which obviously means it’s infernally fantastic); and there’s no time to breathe as the power trio attacks our senses with hatred and electricity in Dybbukim, an enraged display of Thrash Metal where Burak bursts his lungs growling manically while Gürkan alternates between more rhythmic moments and sheer brutality on drums.

The trio keeps hammering and pounding our heads in Wisdom of Sacrilegious, with Burak’s shredding being amplified by Okan and Gürkan’s kitchen of hell, therefore resulting in nonstop action in the form of Turkish Thrash Metal for our avid ears. Then razor-edged riffs and bestial beats turn up the heat in Supreme Command, a classic Bay Area Thrash chant made in Turkey where Burak’s roars get more and more deranged as the music progresses, while Okan’s bass punches add an overdose of metal to the overall result. And if you thought the trio couldn’t sound more violent and visceral you better get ready for Through the Crimson Darkness, bringing forward slashing riffs, unstoppable beats and endless aggressiveness flowing from all instruments.

Then drinking from the same electrifying fountain as thrash masters Slayer and Exodus, the band offers us a breathtaking hymn of evil entitled Slaughtered By Hellgoats, where our beloved Turkish triumvirate is on absolute fire from start to finish; followed by Post Apocalyptic Holy Terror, a beautiful name for a “gentle” composition by Thrashfire. Burka sounds deeply infuriated and possessed with his vocals and riffs, not to mention Gürkan’s stone crushing drums, being highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a good old, violent mosh pit. High Heel in the Hell is a solid, straightforward tune also perfect for slamming into the pit, with Burak and Okan smashing their strings in great fashion, and after the music is over it’s time for the traditional “body count”. And lastly, we’re treated to over six minutes of old school thrash in the title-track Into the Armageddon, where the trio doesn’t stop delivering extreme aggression and fury. Moreover, Gürkan has a fantastic performance on drums, with the music getting more and more obscure and demonic as it approaches its demolishing and grim conclusion.

If you want to get caught in a mosh, you can enjoy Into the Armageddon in its entirety on YouTube and on Spotify, and purchase your copy of the album from the Xtreem Music’s BandCamp page or webstore, as well as from Apple Music or Amazon. Also, don’t forget to show your support to underground Turkish metal by following the band on Facebook, preparing yourself for total annihilation to the sound of the music crafted by three metallers from “the land of four seasons” who are ready to thrash until their very last breath.

Best moments of the album: Dybbukim, Supreme Command and Slaughtered By Hellgoats.

Worst moments of the album: None.

Released in 2019 Xtreem Music

Track listing
1. Pure Devastating Necromancy 2:58
2. Katacomb (The Kingdom of Ressurrection) 5:03
3. Dybbukim 3:33
4. Wisdom of Sacrilegious 3:53
5. Supreme Command 5:49
6. Through the Crimson Darkness 3:17
7. Slaughtered By Hellgoats 3:06
8. Post Apocalyptic Holy Terror 5:11
9. High Heel in the Hell 3:19
10. Into the Armageddon 6:16

Band members
Burak Tavus – vocals, guitar
Okan Özden – bass
Gürkan Güvendik – drums

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